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Service-Disabled / Veteran-Owned FAQs

How do I certify my company as a Veteran-Owned Small Business (VOSB)?

To begin this process, the majority shareholder, who must own not less than 51% of the company, must be in receipt of the Department of the Defense Form 214 (DD Form 214) indicating that the shareholder received an Honorable discharge from his branch of service. The shareholder must contact the local Small Business Administration (SBA) representative to register the company as a VOSB.  Next, the shareholder must visit the System for Award Management and each of the Army's and other services' vendor registration databases and register their company as a VOSB to begin receiving future procurement opportunities.

How do I certify my company as a Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business (SDVOSB)?

To begin this process, the majority shareholder (must own not less than 51% of the company, the management and daily business operations of which are controlled by one or more service-disabled veterans, or in the case of a veteran with a permanent and severe disability, a spouse or permanent caregiver of such veteran) must be in receipt of the Veteran Administrative Certificate/document indicating that the shareholder is classified as a Service-Disabled Veteran (a veteran with a service-connected disability who has been determined by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to have a permanent and total disability for the purposes of receiving disability compensation or a disability pension) and a copy of the Department of the Defense Form 214 (DD Form 214) indicating that the shareholder received an Honorable discharge from his branch of service. This certificate/document self-certifies the company as a SDVOSB. The shareholder must contact the local Small Business Administration (SBA) representative to register the company as a SDVOSB. Next, the shareholder must visit the System for Award Management (SAM) and each of the Army's and other services' vendor registration databases to register his/her company as a SDVOSB to begin receiving future procurement opportunities.

What does the new Public Law 108-183 do for SDVOSBs?

This new law requires federal agencies and departments to give special consideration to service disabled veterans who own small businesses during the procurement process. These special considerations provide sole source and restricted competition contracting opportunities for SDVOSB entities. The legislation is monumental because it is the first time a contracting officer can award a contract based on service disabled veteran owned status.

What types of opportunities are available to businesses (particularly small ones) that want to become government suppliers?

There are vast opportunities to do business with the federal government and particularly with the U.S. Army. The Army procures a wide range of supplies and services to support the Warfighter both in the field and in garrison through Major Commands. The most important step is identifying the supply or service you wish to sell to the Army. When making this decision it is important to review the relevance of the product, the amount purchased by the agency you want to do business with, and the core competencies within your business model to compete and deliver on time at a fair and reasonable price.